Discount Web Hosting – Using Bluehost’s Free Video Tutorials to Achieve Your Site Goals

While many web hosting companies offer support and assistance through phone, forums or web chat, few offer a comprehensive video library to help you learn about nearly every aspect of your hosting account and features. Bluehost offers a large collection of videos on YouTube to help you implement new features on your website and maximize the benefits of their hosting services.

Topics discussed in the video collection include beginner tutorials, such as using cPanel or installing scripts with SimpleScripts, and more advanced topics, such as search engine optimization and page rank improvement. This makes it easy for any site administrator to create powerful content and improve the efficiency of their website. By providing the information in a video format, you can follow along at your own pace while enjoying in-depth views of the entire process or topic being discussed.

The newest series of videos available for viewing is a seven-part tutorial on installing and using WordPress. These guides cover everything from the initial installation and account creation to optimizing your themes and content for browsing and ranking within search engines. What could take thousands of words and pictures to explain is explained clearly in a short series of videos that are perfect for novices, yet still maintain value for advanced users as well.

Other topics covered by the video tutorial library include email account creation, FTP account creation, search engine optimization, setting up email forwarders, traffic generation, email filters and e-commerce site creation. Best of all, these guides are available to anyone. You do not have to be a client of their web hosting services to enjoy the benefits these videos have to offer. Of course, some of the videos are specific to software or interfaces exclusive to Bluehost. However, many of the videos are about common topics and themes in web hosting and site creation.

When used in conjunction with a hosting account, these videos help to clear up much of the confusion about web hosting, site creation and site administration. Many of the videos offer additional resources to explore for further clarification and information as well. With so much information available on Internet marketing, web design, web hosting and site creation, it is easy to get lost in the details and become confused or frustrated. These videos are a great way to cut through the massive amounts of information available and obtain clear, concise instruction from a reliable source.

Web Development Lifecycle (WDL)

The web development lifecycle (WDL) is a more specific variation on the general framework for developing any application development project. Unlike general application development, all web design and development projects follow a similar structure, so the web development lifecycle / process can be drawn upon as a point of reference for both the web development team and the client to determine the status of any given project and the area of activity to address next.

The Web Development Lifecycle is made up of eight identifiable stages described as follows:

1. Initial Consultation

The Initial Consultation seeks to understand the high level business requirements, the scale of the web development, required delivery schedule, and the overall feasibility, web design and cost of the project.

2. Project Specification

The business requirements of the proposed website are iteratively established between the Client and the web design team, and documented in the form of a High Level Requirements Specification. Focus here is on the relevant business rules and outputs. Implementation of the system, how the requirements are actually delivered, is reserved for later. Once agreed, this document will form the basis of the subsequent stages of the Web Development Lifecycle.

3. Web Site Architecture

Here the software and hardware requirements for delivery of the web application are established, such as the most appropriate web and application development language, operating system, database management system (DBMS), and hardware / hosting environment that are most appropriate to support the final website in a robust and reliable manner; taking account of the likely growth of data volumes, visitor numbers web traffic, and functionality.

4. Web Site Design Cycle

Deliverables out of this phase have a particular focus on the web design of the system, include mock-ups or prototypes of the screens that make up the system, combined with system walkthroughs which will enable both the Client and the software developers, designers and project management team to clearly understand how the website will work from the user and administrators perspective. The design of the CRM would also be full considered here also. This web application functionality is considered in the context of the defined outputs and business rules, and may result in the High Level Requirement Specification being updated or changed. Following this, a key deliverable here is a Low Level Website Design Specification / Document precisely defining the required implementation of the web design and forming a blue print of the project for the software developers.

5. Content Collation

Any required textual and graphical content for the web application is developed or acquired by the Client (or the software development company, depending on the relevant situation). Admin functionality which enables the Client to amend the full content of the site from system launch, and on an ongoing basis, is assumed to have been included and defined within the High Level Requirements Specification, as mentioned.

6. Web Site Project development

At this stage a detailed project plan will have been established for the implementation of the web design, resources identified, time scales defined, and project dependencies clearly understood – especially with respect to which parts of the web development can be done in serial or parallel. This stage actually overlaps with the next stage of the Web Development Lifecycle since all web developed modules are unit tested to destruction by the corresponding web development team members. Further, it is very important that all code produced by the software developers is quality checked to ensure adherence to project development standards.

7. Testing & Quality Assurance

Many forms of testing are carried out during this phase, from system and volume testing – in order to ensure that all components work together within the web application and can easily cope with both the initial and anticipated future demands on the system – all the way to User Acceptance Testing (UAT) and sign-off. There are many forms of testing required during this phase that are beyond the scope of this introduction, such as cross-browser and security testing – all contributing towards the delivery of a high-quality website and service to the client.

8. Web Site Deployment (Launch)

Once the website implementation is tested and released by both the client and software development company as being fully operational, the website is deployed to the production environment and open to the relevant user base. Following this there is generally a pre-agreed period of warranty and an ongoing support agreement can be established at the discretion of the client.

The process can vary but, generally speaking, the dependencies and features of a successful process of delivering webs applications to the client does not. I hope this has been a useful introduction to the process of delivering quality web applications to any business.

What Does a Web Developer Do?

Web development is a craft that includes many different technologies. However, at the core of it all the responsibility of the web developer is to ensure that the client gets a website that does exactly what he wants it to do. There is a huge difference between being a web developer and a web designer, although their roles do have some overlap, the web designer will rarely be involved with any of the actual code that makes up the web site.

1. Plan The Design And Functionality Of The Website

It usually takes a while before the web developer actually starts to write the code that makes up the web site. When you get the contract for a web project there is a lot of planning and analysis that needs to take place. Usually the customer requires the website to function in a certain way. It is up to the project manager and his development team to estimate how long this will take.

During this stage the web designer will most likely participate to make sure that his design works with the customers requirements. Indeed, the requirements will most likely include details about how the customer wants the web site to appear.

2. Create The Business Logic As Specified By The Customer

When the planning and analysis stage has been completed the web developer will start developing the website. This often includes working with both client side technologies such as HTML, Java Script and CSS and server side technologies such as PHP and.NET.

A good web developer needs to be proficient with many technologies. There is no such thing as a pure HTML developer!

Knowing which tools to use for each part of the web site is instrumental to the success of the project.

3. Implementing The Web Design

You might think that when the web developer is done developing the web site the web designer would start implementing the web site. Even though they often work together it is usually the web developer who is tasked with implementing the web design on the web site.

It is critical that the web designer and the web developer work together on this!

4. Testing, Testing, Testing

Testing is arguably the most important, and most often neglected, part of a web development project. If there are critical errors on the website when it is launched the customer is at risk of losing a lot of money and certainly a lot of credibility.

Having said that the web developer should not be responsible for testing the web site. It is critically important that it is tested by someone who has not been involved in the actual development of the web site.

Would you believe – These 4 stages often takes place at the same time. Iterative development has become increasingly popular, meaning that parts of the website will most likely be tested while other parts of the site is still in development.

Modern web development include many different tasks, but it all starts with the fundamentals.